View of the reviewer with a Gregory Maven backpack and her dog during a hike

Gregory Maven 55 Review (I Tested it in the Wild in 2023)

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👉 Jump to: Review Summary | Video Review | Features Review | Specs Chart | Alternatives | FAQs

If you’re looking for a hands-on Gregory Maven review, you won’t find one more honest and comprehensive than this detailed breakdown of the popular hiking backpack. 

My friend Skycie and I recently went on an exhilarating 5-day trek with the specific goal of testing 2023’s best backpacking packs. Braving snowy terrain and harsh weather, we subjected the bags, including Gregory Maven 55, to the ultimate real-world endurance test. 

I returned home to put the Maven to additional stress tests, and to meticulously research every detail of the pack so I could compare it to the competitors that I also reviewed. 

In this review, I’ll share my honest take on every aspect of the Maven: including features, organization, materials, comfort, and aesthetics. 

By the end of this article, you’ll know if the Gregory Maven is the ideal hiking backpack for you. I also provide a comparison chart, in case you’d prefer its other sizes: the Gregory Maven 45 or the Maven 65, or it’s men’s version: the Gregory Paragon.

If the Maven isn’t right for you, I also share a few worthy alternatives at the end, too. 

Gregory Maven Review Quick Summary

Pros

  • Durable, lightweight materials
  • Can carry up to a 50-lb (22.7-kg) load
  • Tons of pockets, straps, and organizational tools
  • Gender-specific models, various sizes, and adjustable features
  • Includes a rain cover

Cons

  • Waist adjustable feature could be more user-friendly
  • Materials could be more eco-conscious
Skycie with her Gregory Maven backpack and her dog
Skycie and I are fans of the Gregory Maven — but is it right for you?

Gregory Maven is best for:

  • Various types of backpacking trips 
  • A wide range of body types 
  • Those who love to stay organized 

Gregory Maven might not be a fit for:

  • Budget hikers
  • Those seeking the industry’s most eco-friendly products

All things considered, I’ve rated the Gregory Maven 4.9 out of 5 stars overall. Amazingly, the Gregory Maven can carry up to 50 lbs (22.7 kg) despite its extra small/small size weighing just 3.31 lbs (1.5 kg).

Along with various sizes, this lightweight pack is available in a men’s version: the Gregory Paragon.

The author's friend, Skycie testing the Gregory Maven
Skycie testing the Gregory Maven on an 8-mile trail

Both Gregory Maven models come in multiple capacities: 45L, 55L, and 65L. For this review, Skycie and I tested the 55L pack and found it to be ideal for all types of backpacking trips. It’s very comfortable and breathable, and we really loved its extensive organizational features. Several pockets, compression straps, and more are found throughout the pack.

The Gregory Maven’s materials and hardware are highly durable, and I appreciate the included rain cover. I’m also a fan of the hiking pack’s overall aesthetic and customization abilities. This includes an optional sleeping bag compartment and a removable lid. 

The author's friend on a snowy slot canyon in Utah
Snowy slot canyon views in southern Utah

I have very little negative feedback for the Gregory Maven / Paragon series. But my largest qualm relates to its adjustable waist. On one hand, it holds in place and supports load transfer for a variety of body types. But on the other hand, its maneuverability could be greatly improved. 

Word to the wise: don’t extend the belt further than necessary, because reverting this is a frustrating process. 

In addition, I wish that Gregory used more recycled materials to complement the pack’s 40% post-consumer lining. 

But remember, it’s my job to be critical when writing these reviews. Though there may be some areas for improvement, don’t get me wrong — I love the Gregory Maven. It’s one of my favorite backpacking packs I have tested this year!

Video Review Gregory Maven

You can keep scrolling for my detailed Gregory Maven review.

Or click play on my video review rounding up the 8 top backpacking backpacks I compared on our trip in Utah.

(Note: the Gregory Maven section starts at 04:27 in the video).

Gregory Maven Features Review

Skycie getting ready with her Gregory Maven backpack
Gear up — it’s about to get technical!

Alright, that was the quick summary! Now, I’ll go into every detail found on the Gregory Maven. By the end of this section, you’ll know exactly what to expect from this backpacking pack! 

Below, I extensively cover each of the following Gregory Maven features. If you have a burning question, click these links to jump ahead:

Size

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

View of plastic red balls inside the Gregory Maven backpack to test the volume
This test was used to determine the volume of various pockets

The extra small/small Gregory Maven has a volume of 52L. But perhaps you’re wondering, how is that volume dispersed throughout the pack? 

To determine this, I took inspiration from ASTM International’s standardized test. This involved filling each compartment with as many golf balls as possible. Estimating that there are roughly 12 golf balls per liter, here are my findings: 

  • Hip belt pockets (2x) – 9 golf balls / 0.75L per 
  • Side pockets (2x) – 30 golf balls / 2.5L per
  • Front pocket – 52 golf balls / 4.3L 
  • Lid (accounting for both external and internal access) – 100 golf balls / 8.3L 
  • Main compartment – 395 golf balls / 32.9L 

Completing this test made me realize how well-balanced the Gregory Maven pack is. Every piece of gear has a size-appropriate home, while competing packs often have large, undedicated spaces. For more comparative insight, see the chart on our backpacking pack round-up.   

Weight

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

View of Skycie's Gregory Maven backpack weight
During testing, Skycie’s pack weight totaled 20.5 lbs (9.3 kg)

Unloaded, the extra small/small size of the Gregory Maven 55 weighs an impressive 3.31 lbs (1.5 kg). The small/medium size weighs very closely at 3.41 lbs (1.55 kg) but grants an extra three liters of storage. All models mirror this lightweight quality; see the Technical Specifications section for details. 

When testing the Gregory Maven, Skycie’s pack weight totaled 20.5 lbs (9.3 kg). This suited her petite size, but note that the backpack has a max carry capacity of 50 lbs (22.7 kg). This weight-to-carry ratio beats out nearly all other packs we tested! 

👉 Want the Best Weight-To-Carry Ratio? Among the backpacking packs I tested, the Hyperlite 3400 Southwest has the best weight-to-carry ratio. At 2.2 lbs (0.979 kg) and with the ability to carry up to 40 lbs (18.1 kg), it’s the only one that tops this Gregory backpack. 

Height Adjustable

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

Setting up the height adjustable feature of Gregory Maven backpack
A hook-and-loop fastener (think Velcro) holds the torso length in place

Most backpacking packs have an adjustable torso length feature, but not all are user-friendly. Fortunately, the Gregory Maven makes customization simple. The hook-and-loop panel is easy to detach, yet feels highly secure once modified. I also like that markings indicate sizes, assisting those who are unsure whether to move the panel higher or lower. 

Torso adjustability, along with gender-specific models in multiple sizes, helps ensure a perfect fit. This influences not only comfort but pack aesthetics. 

Waist Adjustable

⭐ STAR RATING: 3 / 5 stars

Close up view of the adjustable hip belt  on the Gregory Maven backpack
The adjustable hip belt is innovative, but its function could use some work

Using compression straps, all technical hiking packs allow you to adjust the hip belt fit to some extent. But the Gregory Maven is rare in that it has an extendable hip belt. It caters to waists measuring 24 – 46 inches (61 – 116.8 cm). Truly, I love the innovation and inclusivity.  

However, when it comes to functionality, I’m disappointed in this feature. It functions similarly to the adjustable back panel, having a hook-and-loop fastener. You can use your fingers to pry this strip back and tug on the compression strap to get the panel to extend easily enough. 

But getting the panel to revert? Good luck. With patience and persistence, I eventually got the hip belt back to its smallest size. If using this feature, I would highly suggest extending the belt only slightly. Try it on, and continue extending as needed. But avoid overextending to save yourself quite a bit of hassle.  

Comfort 

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

View of the perforated foam of the Gregory Maven backpack
Perforated foam ensures breathability
Close up view of the shoulder straps of the Gregory Maven backpack
Thick padding on the shoulder straps provides comfort

As mentioned above, this pack’s various sizes and adjustable features create a near-custom fit. Standing five feet tall, I fall outside the standard female build, and “one size fits all” packs are seldom suitable. But given these qualities, I found the Gregory Maven to be highly comfortable. 

Other features that contribute to comfort include generously padded shoulder straps. The same can be said of the adjustable hip belt and back panel. In addition, these padded areas are made with perforated foam, granting breathability. 

As far as suspension, the Gregory Maven has a proprietary FreeFloat system. Its frame is designed to support your natural movements when hiking. This prevents pressure on your hip bones, shoulder blades, and so forth.

To clarify, Skycie and I found this pack to be highly comfortable when carrying moderate loads. If you carry more without regard to your abilities, and especially if you exceed its 50-lb (22.7-kg) maximum, you may experience discomfort. Improper packing may also cause issues. 

Internal Organization

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

Close up view of the sleeping bag compartment of the Gregory Maven backpack
An optional sleeping bag compartment is one of this pack’s unique features

The Gregory Maven has the best organization features of all other backpacking packs I tested this year. Its main compartment has a dedicated sleeping bag section. But for those that prefer spaciousness, its toggle buttons allow this feature to be optional. 

View inside the primary compartment of the Gregory Maven backpack
The primary compartment and hydration sleeve
Close up view of the reservoir hook and lower loop of the Gregory Maven backpack
The reservoir hook and versatile lower loop

In addition, the main compartment has a hydration sleeve. Though its hook is intended for Gregory-brand reservoirs, I appreciate its versatile lower loop. One could easily attach a carabiner here to accommodate a variety of reservoir styles. 

Close up view of the reservoir hose of the Gregory Maven backpack
Draw the reservoir hose through the back port, and affix it onto the shoulder strap
Close up view of the side access of the Gregory Maven backpack
Reach all your gear with top, bottom, and side access

Draw the reservoir hose through a port found on the center of the back panel. While such an entry is common, the Gregory Maven stands out in the area of accessibility. 

It’s not only top-loaded but features bottom and side access via a full-length zipper. No other backpack I’ve ever come across makes reaching your gear so effortless. 

External Organization 

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

View of the Gregory Maven backpack external organization
Several loops, straps, and pockets make this pack highly functional

The Gregory Maven impresses with not only its internal organization but also its external features. At its base, you’ll find compression straps with side-release buckles. These work well for bulky and/or heavier items, like a bear canister, sleeping pad, or tent — like the Big Agnes tent pictured here. 

Looking at the front face of the pack, there’s also an adjustable attachment loop on the bottom-right side. This is intended for an ice axe or trekking poles. Secure this type of gear further with the shock lock placed just above the loop. 

View of the pocket on the front face of the Gregory Maven backpack
The wide, mesh pocket on the front face
Close up view of side pocket of the Gregory Maven backpack
Deep mesh side pockets grant multiple uses

The front mesh pocket is wide and versatile. A strap and buckle at its mouth help to secure whatever gear you store here. 

Its side pockets are similar, made with a stretchy mesh that grants versatility. The right pocket has top and side access, which allows you to reach a water bottle without removing the pack. Both side pockets also have compression straps which allow you to secure extra gear, especially taller items. 

Close up view of the zipped hip belt pocket of the Gregory Maven backpack
The pack features two zipped hip belt pockets

Compared to other backpacking packs, I found the two hip belt pockets to be on the smaller side. Unfortunately, I was unable to store my Otterbox-protected iPhone here. But these pockets are ideal for holding trail snacks, sunscreen, and other small items you want quick access to. 

Close up view of a sunglasses on the quickstow system of the Gregory Maven backpack
This “Quickstow” system keeps your sunglasses safe

Speaking of easy access, I love the sunglasses “Quickstow” system. It’s one of the pack’s most unique organizational features. To use it, tuck one arm of your sunglasses into the small shoulder strap loop. Then, extend the lower elastic band up and over your eyewear to hold it in place.  

The pack’s removable lid has two separate compartments

In addition, the lid of the pack is removable, ideal when you want to cut weight. Conveniently, the front two attachment points have side-release buckles. Though, the back three attachment points are ladder lock sliders with straps. 

In my opinion, side-release buckles on all attachment points (as seen on the REI Co-Op Flash 55) would have been more streamlined. But still, I appreciate the ability to adjust the pack to your carry needs. 

When the lid is in use, it’s ideal for small, lightweight items, such as the Black Diamond headlamp pictured above. It also features gear lash points for external storage, as well as an internal zipper. This separate compartment has a key clip, as well as the pack’s included rain jacket. 

Rain Cover 

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

The included rain cover on the Gregory Maven backpack
The Gregory Maven has an included rain cover

The lid’s internal zippered pocket stores the pack’s included rain cover. It’s sized for the bag and features elastic around its edge, creating a secure, waterproof fit. The rain jacket is also the same Rosewood Red color as the pack, and I’m a fan of the put-together look. 

Materials 

⭐ STAR RATING: 4.5 / 5 stars

Close up view of the materials used in Gregory Maven backpack
High-density nylon grants lightweight durability

The pack body is made with 100D and 210D high-density nylon. The pack bottom is similar, being a 420D high-density nylon. 

“D” refers to the denier, or the thickness, of the fabric. The higher the number, the thicker the material. Given the frequency your pack will contact the ground, the more durable base is a smart feature. During testing, Skycie placed this on sharp rocks and ice frequently without any issue. 

High-density nylon is a synthetic fabric that’s lightweight, durable, and water-resistant. Though unadvertised, you can tell by the pack’s grid and diamond patterns that it’s also sewn with a ripstop quality. This means that if a tear were to occur, it would likely stop at the source, rather than continue along the seam. 

In addition, the pack interior is lined with 40% post-consumer recycled 135D polyester. I appreciate this eco-conscious effort on Gregory’s part. But I did knock off a half-star because when it comes to backpacking materials, there’s some stiff competition. 

🌎 Eco-Conscious Packs: If you’re seeking some of the outdoor industry’s most eco-friendly backpacking packs, I have a few suggestions. Check out the REI Co-Op Flash 55, Osprey Eja / Exos, and Osprey Aura / Atmos. All are 100% made with recycled materials. 

Hardware

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

View of the sternum compression strap of the Gregory Maven backpack
The sternum compression strap has a side release buckle, whistle, and hydration hose lock

All hardware on the Gregory Maven is built to last. I find that the buckles function smoothly and latch securely. The same applies to the strap sliders and cord lock on the main compartment’s drawstring. The hydration reservoir hook and trekking pole shock lock also perform well, even when exposed to weight and pressure. 

The sternum strap whistle functions appropriately and is a nice safety feature to have easily accessible. So far, the metal zippers on the lid and hip belt glide as they should, too.  

Aesthetic  

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

Aesthetics are always subjective, but in my opinion, the Gregory Maven is a stylish pack. I love its Rosewood Red version, having varying maroon tones, textures, and subtle patterns. Dusty pink straps and gray accents add further contrast. 

I’m also a fan of the metallic logo embellishments. This reflective element complements the diamond grid seen on the pack face. I also appreciate the matching rain jacket and overall, the brand’s attention to detail. 

Skycie smiling for a photo with her dog
Skycie and her pup posed in a slot canyon

If maroon isn’t your favorite shade, good news — the pack is also available in other colors. These vary by size but include Helium Grey and Spectrum Blue. The men’s Paragon is also available in Burnt Olive, Graphite Blue, Ferrous Orange, and Smoke Grey. 

Warranty 

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

A hiker walking on a snowy trail in Utah with her dog
See McKenna’s guide to Utah hikes to experience views like this!

Overall, I love Gregory’s generous warranty. The brand states, “We guarantee that this product will be free from defects in workmanship and materials for as long as you own it.” 

The Gregory Lifetime Guarantee has been around since 1996 — it’s not a gimmicky new promotion. For decades, the company has stood by its commitment to quality, and its warranty exclusions are very fair. Specifically, Gregory says, “We cannot cover damage due to unreasonable or abusive use, improper cleaning or storage, or normal wear and tear.” 

But even if your Gregory backpack experiences these types of damages, the brand will repair the pack for a “nominal” fee. Again, I find this to be generous, as well as an eco-friendly effort. The company will also send you easy-to-replace parts for you to DIY, which can help expedite the repair process.  

Value

⭐ STAR RATING: 5 / 5 stars

Skycie using the Gregory Maven backpack for a hike during winter season
Other packs struggle to compete with the value of this Gregory backpack

In my opinion, the Gregory Maven 55 / Paragon 58 is a great value. Its rain cover and various organizational features require no additional accessories. When it comes to load capacity, no other comparable pack beats its $259.95 price point — except for one.

The Mountainsmith Apex 60 has a max carry capacity of 60 lbs (27.2 kg). It can also be extended to 70L of volume, and it costs just $219.95. However, it’s only available in a singular size. So, while more affordable than the Maven and Paragon, it’s not nearly as accommodating to various body types.  

Gregory Maven Technical Specifications Chart

Use the below two tables to easily compare the entire Gregory Maven and Paragon series across a variety of technical specifications: carry weight, volume, dimensions, lining, colors, price, and more.

Technical Specs Comparison Chart – Gregory Maven (women’s version)

Gregory Maven 45Gregory Maven 55Gregory Maven 65
Max Carry Weight40 lbs (18.1 kg)50 lbs (22.7 kg)50 lbs (22.7 kg)
XS/S Volume2563 in3 / 42 L3173 in3 / 52 L3783 in3 / 62 L
S/M Volume2746 in3 / 45 L3356 in3 / 55 L3966 in3 / 65 L
XS/S Dimensions26.4 x 14.2 x 10.0 in (67 x 36 x 25.5 cm)26.8 x 14.6 x 10.2 in (68 x 37 x 26 cm)27.2 x 15.0 x 11.0 in (69 x 38 x 28 cm)
S/M Dimensions28.3 x 14.2 x 10.0 in (72 x 36 x 25.5 cm)29.1 x 14.6 x 10.2 (74 x 37 x 26 cm) 29.5 x 15.0 x 10.6 in (75 x 38 x 28 cm)
XS/S Weight3.23 lbs (1.47 kg)3.31 lbs (1.5 kg)3.39 lbs (1.54 kg)
S/M Weight3.3 lbs (1.5 kg)3.41 lbs (1.55 kg)3.51 lbs (1.59 kg)
Pack Body100D high-density nylon / 210D high-density nylon100D high-density nylon / 210D high-density nylon100D high-density nylon / 210D high-density nylon
Pack Bottom420D high-density nylon420D high-density nylon420D high-density nylon
Lining40% post-consumer recycled 135D polyester40% post-consumer recycled 135D polyester40% post-consumer recycled 135D polyester
Color OptionsHelium Grey, Rosewood RedRosewood Red, Spectrum BlueHelium Grey, Spectrum Blue
Price$229.95$259.95$279.95

Technical Specs Comparison Chart – Gregory Paragon (men’s version)

Gregory Paragon 48Gregory Paragon 58Gregory Paragon 68
Max Carry Weight40 lbs (18.1 kg)50 lbs (22.7 kg)50 lbs (22.7 kg)
S/M Volume2746 in3 / 45 L3356 in3 / 55 L3966 in3 / 65 L
M/L Volume2929 in3 / 48 L3539 in3 / 58 L4150 in3 / 68 L
S/M Dimensions28.3 x 14.2 x 10.0 in (72 x 36 x 25.5 cm)29.1 x 14.6 x 10.2 in (74 x 37 x 26 cm) 29.5 x 15.0 x 10.6 in (75 x 38 x 27 cm)
M/L Dimensions30.3 x 14.2 x 9.8 in (77 x 36 x 25 cm) 31.1 x 14.6 x 10.2 in (79 x 37 x 26 cm)31.5 x 15.0 x 10.6 in (80 x 38 x 27 cm)
S/M Weight3.4 lbs (1.54 kg)3.47 lbs (1.57 kg)3.52 lbs (1.6 kg)
M/L Weight3.53 lbs (1.6 kg)3.58 lbs (1.62 kg)3.71 lbs (1.68 kg)
Pack Body100D high-density nylon / 210D high-density nylon100D high-density nylon / 210D high-density nylon100D high-density nylon / 210D high-density nylon
Pack Bottom420D high-density nylon420D high-density nylon420D high-density nylon
Lining40% post-consumer recycled 135D polyester40% post-consumer recycled 135D polyester40% post-consumer recycled 135D polyester
Color OptionsBurnt Olive, Smoke GreyBurnt Olive, Graphite Blue, Ferrous OrangeSmoke Grey, Graphite Blue, Ferrous Orange
Price$229.95$249.95 – 259.95$269.95 – 279.95
Table Data Sources: data reported by Gregory. Travel Lemming has tested and confirmed these dimensions for the Gregory Maven 55 (extra small/small size). However, we have not manually confirmed this data for all other models.

Gregory Maven Alternatives

If you still have a few concerns after reading my Gregory Maven review, no worries. 

These alternatives, which I’ve personally tested as part of my ranking of the best backpacking packs, may better fit your needs: 

REI Co-Op Flash 55 

Based on comparable products, the Gregory Maven 55 comes at a good value. But if a $200 price point is closer to your budget, check out the REI Co-Op Flash 55

As I share in my REI Flash 55 review, this pack is very similar to the Gregory Maven / Paragon. It’s available in multiple sizes and gender-specific models, resulting in a highly comfortable fit. It has many organizational features, along with 55L of volume. Though, you can easily customize the pack to your carry needs with several modification options. 

Note that while water-resistant, the REI Co-Op Flash 55 does not come with a rain cover. But if you already have one and a 30-lb (13.6-lb) capacity suits you, this pack could cut your expense by nearly 25%. 

Osprey Eja / Exos 

Gregory is, by no means, a brand that ignores eco-consciousness. It also has several admirable goals to improve in this area. But one of its major competitors has already addressed some of them: Osprey. 

If you want one of the most eco-friendly packs on the market, but the Gregory Maven isn’t quite right for you, consider the Osprey Eja / Exos. This durable, lightweight pack is completely made with recycled nylon ripstop fabric. Comparatively, the Maven and Paragon do not use recycled nylon, and their lining is 40% post-consumer material. 

In addition, the Osprey Eja / Exos uses a PFC / PFAS-free DWR (durable water repellent). The brand also abides by the bluesign® Restricted Substances List. This eliminates and minimizes the use of environmentally harmful chemicals during manufacturing. When it comes to its hardware, Gregory plans to make this shift by 2025. 

Outside of environmental factors, the packs are very similar. Enjoy a near-custom, comfortable fit, and up to 58L of volume. A rain cover is not included and the Osprey Eja / Exos has a max carry capacity of 35 lbs (15.9 kg). But it’s a highly functional pack that suits a variety of preferences.

FINAL VERDICT – Is The Gregory Maven Worth It? 

After extensive tests in real-world conditions, I can say with certainty that the Gregory Maven is worth it. 

The Gregory Maven’s weight-to-carry ratio is astonishing, suitable for short trips and long thru-hikes. Its included rain cover makes it a one-and-done kit, and undoubtedly, it’s built to last. I absolutely love the pack’s thoughtful organization and customizable features. 

The author's friend, Skycie smiling for a photo
Hands down, the Gregory Maven is one of the year’s best backpacking packs

Even though its waist adjuster could be more user-friendly, I appreciate the inclusivity. With an adjustable height, gender-specific models, and several sizes, this pack grants comfort to many body types. 

I wish that Gregory had used more eco-friendly materials when constructing this pack. But I look forward to seeing the brand accomplish its admirable goals outlined on its Sustainability page. And, I look forward to using the Gregory Maven many more times this season! It’s one I’ll be pulling from my gear rack often. 

FAQs about the Gregory Maven

How much does the Maven 65 weigh?

The Maven 65 weighs 3.39 lbs (1.54 kg) in its extra small/small size. The model’s small/medium size weighs 3.51 lbs (1.59 kg). See our full list of Gregory Maven specifications for more.

Does Gregory have a lifetime warranty?

Gregory does have a lifetime warranty. The Gregory Lifetime Guarantee covers manufacturer defects, regardless of purchase date. However, according to the brand, it does not cover “unreasonable or abusive use, improper cleaning or storage, or normal wear and tear.” 

***

I hope you found this Gregory Maven review to be helpful. If you’re still comparing hiking packs, be sure to check out my ranking of the best backpacking backpacks

Thanks for reading, and happy trails! 

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Maven 55

The Gregory Maven is a durable, lightweight pack with an impressive load capacity. Its internal and external organization is unparalleled. Plus, its multiple models cater to various body types and backpacking trips.

Product Brand: Gregory

Editor's Rating:
4.9

Pros

  • Durable, lightweight materials
  • Can carry up to a 50-lb (22.7-kg) load
  • Tons of pockets, straps, and organizational tools
  • Gender-specific models, various sizes, and adjustable features
  • Includes a rain cover

Cons

  • Waist adjustable feature could be more user-friendly
  • Materials could be more eco-conscious

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